Masters of Body Art- Tattoo Honolulu Exhibit

Sorry my fashion darlings, but I just can’t get enough of Hawaiiana art and culture!

Here’s a quick post on a current exhibit at the Honolulu Museum of Art that I got to visit (again) today.

“The Honolulu Museum of Art breaks new ground with an exhibition focusing on Hawai‘i’s high quality of tattoo art—and how it sprouted from the islands’ mix of cultures rich with tattoo traditions -Hawaiian, American, Japanese and Polynesian cultures. By linking the past with the present, the museum hopes to expand cultural awareness not only about the art of the tattoo, but also the rich cultural traditions it is based on.” -Honolulu Museum of Art

Presently, Honolulu is recognized as one of the world’s tattoo meccas.

Featuring the work of 10 tattoo masters, the museum displays a photographic collection of their craft, skills and ideas. An example of the featured photograph:

The exhibition began on June 14, 2012 and will run through January 13, 2013.

Also available at the museum is the Tattoo Film Festival between June 23rd and July 6, 2012.

A Lecture series by Tricia Allen entitled Tattoo Traditions of Polynesia will be held on July 30th and August 5th at 7:30pm.

On a personal level, I don’t see myself ever marking my body in that way permanently, as I see my body as a temple, I respect it too deeply 😉 However, after today, I also have a new found respect for tattoos as a form of historical art, tying our peoples, culture and generations together.

I won’t be posting too much photos as I would rather that you visit the exhibit to see the for yourself the magnificent work of these artists.

Thanks to the ladies Jen, Jena, Catt, Retch, Sammie, Nat, Ersa, Janice and the only gent Jacob for a wonderful tour at the Honolulu Museum of Art. As always, I had a fabulous time!

“Art is a shadow of what a person is thinking. a small glimpse of what they hold inside. Little secrets, regrets, joys… every line has its own meaning.” -Unknown

Love,
Honey

Hawaii Plantation Village

While we are on the topic of museums…

Another great place that I visited during my staycay (stay + vacay) here in Hawaii Nei the beginning of June was the historical Hawaii Plantation Village, an outdoor museum in old Waipahu.

“Hawaii’s Plantation Village is an outdoor museum that tells the story of life on Hawaii’s Sugar Plantations (circa 1850-1950). The Village includes restored buildings and replicas of plantation structures such as houses of various ethnic groups, community buildings such as the plantation store, infirmary, community bathhouse, and manager’s office. We share the story of Hawaii’s various cultures, including Hawaiian, Chinese, Portuguese, Puerto Rican, Japanese, Korean, and Filipino.” – Hawaii Plantation Village

It was a very educational experience.  Almost like stepping back into time and grasping the life and culture of the plantation workers who made Hawaii to be what it is today.  We had a wonderful tour guide named Brenda, and  with it just being my sister and I, it was like having a private tour 🙂

By visiting the museum, I know that I have paid my gratitude to those who lived the harsh life of the plantation to give their families and the future generation better opportunity.

Definitely a must-see if you are into Hawaiian history and culture.

Hawaii’s Plantation Village
94-695 Waipahu Street
Waipahu, HI 96797
tel: (808) 677-0110
www.hawaiiplantationvillage.org

Admissions
General Adult Admission: $13.00

Discounted Rates
Out-of-State Seniors (62+ with ID): $10.00
Military (with valid ID): $7.00
Kama’aina (with valid ID): $7.00
Youth (ages 4-11 years): $5.00
Child (3 and under): FREE

Some photos:

Love,
Honey

The Honolulu Academy of Arts

“No great artist ever sees things as they really are.
If he did, he would cease to be an artist.”
-Oscar Wilde

Back in April I had the opportunity to chaperone my little sister and niece for a museum tour (and art lessons) at The Honolulu Academy of Arts. 

“The Honolulu Museum of Art is dedicated to the collection, preservation, interpretation, and teaching of the visual arts, and the presentation of exhibitions, films and videos, performing arts, and public programs specifically relevant to Hawai’i’s ethnically diverse community.” – The Honolulu Academy of Arts

It was an inspiring, innovative and educational experience, (several great reasons to visit any art exhibit).  The Art Docents were marvelous-knowledgeable and passionate about the subject.  The girls got to learn basic art techniques and grasped the story behind some of the most talented artists and their world-renowned work.

Located in the heart of Beretania, across Thomas Square Park, the intriguing Honolulu Academy of Arts is a must-see. The museum offers a wide-range of docent and self-guided tours for students and adults. Scheduled guided tours such as Spotlight Tours, Tea + Tour, Book Club and Walk-In tours, just to name a few, are free (with paid admission).

900 South Beretania Street
Honolulu, Hawaii 96814
808-532-8700
http://www.honoluluacademy.org

Museum Hours:
Monday- Closed
Tuesday thru Saturday- 10:00am – 4:30pm
Sunday- 1:00pm -5:00pm

Admission:
Children under 4 years- Free
Children 4-17 years old- $5
Adults- $10

Sketching (pencil only, no ink) and still photography (no flash) are permitted in most galleries… yes, photo ops with famous paintings ARE available 🙂 Emphasis on NO TOUCHING any artwork please!

My favorite painting can be found in the “Orange Room”. I’d love to hang this on my palace walls one day 😉 😉

Some photos below:

If you have some free time and in the mood to be inspired, visit the Honolulu Academy of Arts! 😉

Love,
Honey

Aloha Beautiful! – The Transit of Venus

A rare and beautiful astronomical event will take place tomorrow, Tuesday, June 5th, 2012.

The planet Venus will be in transit…. passing directly between the Sun and the Earth and becoming visible to us as a small, dark disk moving across the face of the Sun.

photo from ecorazzi.com

The only planetary transits observable on Earth are of Mercury and Venus. Mercury has an average of 13 transits every 100 years. The Transit of Venus, however is phenomenal, occurring in a pattern that repeats every 243 years, with a pair of transits eight years apart. In this century, the prior transit was on June 8, 2004. After 2012, the next transit of Venus will take place in December 2117!

The entire event will be widely visible from the western Pacific, northwester North America, eastern Asia (including Japan and the Philippines) and eastern Australia.

I can honestly say that I will not be holding on until 2117 to witness the next transit of Venus, which is why I am dedicating a few hours of my afternoon to catch a glimpse and say my aloha to the beautiful planet.  Lucky I am an island girl and live in Hawaii, as it is one of the best locations to witness this spectacular occasion.

According to transitofvenus.org, the local transit times in Honolulu are between 12pm – 6pm.

NASA EDGE at Mauna Kea (through partnership with UH Institute of Astronomy on the Big Island of Hawaii) will also be having a live webcast during this time. Watch it here.

When viewing the sun, take precautions! Construct a pinhole-camera, or a pinhole mirror. If available utilize binoculars or a telescope, but remember, do not look DIRECTLY at the sun! Venus should appear as a tiny dot on the projected image. You can also consider purchasing a shade 13 or 14 arc-welder’s glass.

Hope everyone can get to see The Transit of Venus; you won’t want to miss such an astonishing occurrence of this lifetime.

 


Honey

Giving Back- American Cancer Society Bridging Birthdays

My favorite ladies and I are yet again taking a great new venture together. After a feel-good-because-we-are-giving-back-to-our-community experience from volunteering at the Great Aloha Run this February, we decided that we didn’t mind doing it again. This time, we’re going bigger. With American Cancer Society. The American Cancer Society is a national non-profit health organization […]

Oh-So-Cuteness! Teddy Bear World Hawaii

After spending a lovely and delicious Mother’s Day Brunch at Tiki’s in the Aston Hotel at Waikiki, the boyfriend took me to a neverending world of cuteness, The Teddy Bear World Hawaii, a new attraction in the heart of the Waikiki across the Royal Hawaiian Shopping Center.

It made me feel like a five-year-old girl again.

There were hundreds of bears dressed, and placed in everything you could imagine… From the eight wonders of the world, to an era in the land before time. We even got to see a private concert from the Teddy Bear Elvis himself 

The museum was a $7 million project, and it definitely is worth the time to visit- the teddy bear themes were very detailed and interactive, and you will learn a lot throughout the tour. You’ll also get to meet Hawaii’s own President Obama… well the teddy bear version anyway 😉

Honey Aubrey Teddy Bear World Hawaii

Rates are $15 for adults, $13 for Juniors, and children 4 years and under are free.

Of course Kama’aina Rates are $11 for adults, and $7 for Juniors.

Teddy Bear World Hawaii
2155 Kalakaua Ave.,
Suite 200 Honolulu, HI 96815
(808) 921-8011

Here are some photos:

If you are ever visiting the island, this is definitely a place to see! You’ll have a blast. We did!

Love,
Honey

Cup of Goodness- Volunteering in Guatemala

There are some people in this world that you just have to be surrounded with. The kind of people that are positive, energetic, and have a remarkable aura that make you feel good, be good and do good.

One of my darling best friends, and of course one of my favorite girls in this world, Kelsie Pascual are just one of those special people.  She is absolutely amazing.

I spent Sunday afternoon listening to her great adventure as a volunteer abroad in Guatemala.  She arrived at my house with some souvenirs- beautiful handcrafted butterfly decors (“They love butterflies in Guatemala!”,and….

surprise, surprise, traditionally handmade chocolate from Guatemala (“Hon, I actually learned how to make real chocolate!”)

I also learned within a few minutes that if mixed with hot water, these crunchy chocolates can turn into the most delicious hot cocoa ever made.

Hearing about Kelsie’s stories during her travel is like drinking from a never-ending cup of goodness.

Read below:::

How inspiring. Go Kelsie!

Love,
Honey

New Year’s Traditions All Around the World

Cheers to a New Year and another chance for us to get it right.

– Oprah Winfrey

People around the world, pessimists and optimists alike usher in the new year in distinctive ways. Whether its to bring in great luck, or to simply just forget memories of the ending year, the New Year signifies a new beginning, and new opportunities.

Here are some interesting ways New Year’s Eve is celebrated in different countries:

JAPAN- Bonenkai or “forget-the-year parties” are held to say goodbye to all worries, misunderstandings, grudges and all other problems of the previous year, and prepare for a new beginning. At midnight on New Year’s Eve, the Buddhist temples strike their gongs 108 times, an attempt to dismiss the 108 types of human weaknesses.

SPAIN & PORTUGAL– When the clocks strikes 12, it is a tradition to quickly consume 12 grapes, one grape for each stroke of  the clock, signifying good luck for each month of the coming year.

ITALY- Red underwear is worn, supposedly bringing love and luck in the New Year. Lentil stew is also eaten when the bell strikes at midnight- one spoonful per toll of the bell.

GREECE- A special New Year cake is baked by all the members of the family, called the St. Basil’s cake. A silver or gold coin is buried in the dough and baked. The cake is distributed to everyone and whoever finds the coin in their piece of cake is said to be especially lucky during the coming year.

PHILIPPINES- Round shapes symbolize prosperity for the coming year as they represent coins. Round fruits are displayed on the dining table during New Year’s Eve, and clothing with circular patterns such as polka dots are also worn. To scare off evil spirits, people also blow on “torotots” (plastic horns), bang pots and pans, and of course, lighting firecrackers and fireworks is a tradition.

DENMARK- Danes collect old dishes throughout the year and then throw them at the front doors of friends and families. The more broken dishes you have to clean means the more friends you have.

It’s still 10:30pm here in Hawaii, and we still have an hour and half til midnight. Most of you may have already rung in the new year, but regardless of where you are in the world, what traditions you practice, may you have a fabulous, and very Happy 2012!

Love,
Honey